I have a serious mental illness and I don’t want to die young

No one ever said having bipolar disorder is fair.  Not only does it take years to find the right combination of medications, it also takes a great deal of time to sort out how to best take care of ourselves.  One of the biggest lessons I’ve learned is we must learn how to advocate for our best interest as patients.  We have to take care of not only our mental health but our physical health too.

Research has shown people who live with serious mental illness die 25 years younger than those in the general population.  There are many reasons for this statistic.  One of the main reasons is because the very medications which work to treat bipolar disorder have significant side effects.  Many cause substantial weight gain and that leads to obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Ask yourself the question, “When is the last time my psychiatrist talked to me about the side effects of all the medications I’m taking?” 

I’ll say upfront I have an excellent psychiatrist.  She’s helped me more in six years than all the doctors I’ve ever had combined.  What probably helped save me was her insistence that I have a blood test once a year to measure cholestoral and blood sugar levels.  Because one of the medications I take raises cholesterol and blood sugar levels.  All the medications I take cause weight gain.  Weight gain increases the risk for diabetes.

But my doctor never had the candid conversation about medication side effects and what the risks are.  Perhaps because it was imperative to work on getting my mental health stable first.  Her job is not to pay attention to my physical health.  And honestly I’ve been fearful of my increased risk for type 2 diabetes since I first started taking anti-psychotics (e.g. Risperdal, Seroquel, Zyprexa, Saphris, Latuda).

At the same time, when I haven’t been taking an anti-psychotic my mania went off the charts and I had dangerous psychotic episodes.  The trade offs for taking these medications come with a cost.

My day of having these medication side-effects and my lack of following a better nutrition plan has now put me in the position of having diabetes.  I’m not happy about it.  It was something I feared.

In my most recent visit to my psychiatrist my blood work showed I’m .01% away from having type 2 diabetes.  Which essentially means, I have it.  My worst fear came true.  But now that I know I’ll be following up with my primary care doctor and getting on a plan to have better health.

The number one cause of death for people with bipolar disorder is cardiovascular disease.  Managing bipolar disorder means managing overall health, not just mental stability.  Everyone who has bipolar or any other mental illness should make an appointment and see a primary care doctor at least once a year.  Learn the side effects of the medications and take them seriously.

A lot can happen in 25 years.  I’d like to be around to see it.

 

10 thoughts on “I have a serious mental illness and I don’t want to die young

  1. I’m so sorry that you now have to deal with diabetes on top of everything else. Perhaps, with your physician’s help, you can keep it under control with just a good well rounded, diet plan. A lady from my church has done that and her numbers have gone back to normal. Of course she has to maintain the eating plan to keep it that way. I wish that kind of success for you, my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I was pre-diabetic until I got on the present medication that I’m on now I lost a lot of weight although recently I’ve gained a few pounds so I’m trying to get it off I I will make an appointment with my family doctor to check my cholesterol triglycerides and sugar

    Like

    1. Thanks I’m doing well. I found out today I ONLy have prediabetes..still a chance to make some lifestyle changes. I think of you too!!! We’ve been on this journey together for a while. Working on my second book! Very exciting! Hope all is well in your world.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s